new-york

Robert Longo, After de Kooning (Woman and Bicycle, 1952–1953), 2014, charcoal on mounted paper, 90 × 57 5/8".

Robert Longo

Metro Pictures

Robert Longo, After de Kooning (Woman and Bicycle, 1952–1953), 2014, charcoal on mounted paper, 90 × 57 5/8".

Conjuring some of the best-known images in American art through a method both meticulous and transformative, Robert Longo’s Metro Pictures show this past spring comprised a dozen charcoal drawings of classic works of Abstract Expressionism. Copied not exactly 1:1 but in sizes evoking the grand canvases of Jackson Pollock and the rest, the pictures seem instantly and deliciously familiar but at the same time strange, for while they minutely duplicate every detail of their originals, they of course lose all of those works’ color. That’s not so disorienting in the case of Franz Kline’s black-and-white New York, N.Y., 1953, but it’s a weird shift for Willem de Kooning’s Woman and Bicycle, 1952–53, with its reds and greens, creams and pinks—and yet not so weird, for we’ve all seen these works in black-and-white. At one time, in fact, probably more people nationally and globally

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