new-york

Sam Pulitzer, Non-Ludic Induction Site, 2014, assorted nineteenth- and twentieth-century antiques, bespoke canvas mattress ticks filled with locally sourced straw, tactical laser, single-suction camera mount, plastic ear gauge, beeswax candle, reclaimed wood, museum-board wall label, hardware, dimensions variable.

Sam Pulitzer

Artists Space Exhibitions

Sam Pulitzer, Non-Ludic Induction Site, 2014, assorted nineteenth- and twentieth-century antiques, bespoke canvas mattress ticks filled with locally sourced straw, tactical laser, single-suction camera mount, plastic ear gauge, beeswax candle, reclaimed wood, museum-board wall label, hardware, dimensions variable.

The number of parts that Sam Pulitzer piled into his first US institutional exhibition, “A Colony for ‘Them,’” is so massive that it might take a book to account for them all, never mind the vast amount of text that appeared across the show’s walls. One might go so far as to say, in fact, that this glut of signifiers could be read as a demand that the exhibition not be reviewed, that it would prefer, to borrow a phrase from the critic Dick Hebdige, to continue “hiding in the light.” Hebdige has long written about various subcultures, from mods to punks to skinheads, and Pulitzer himself trades heavily in similar “underground” associations while updating them to correspond with today’s Net-dependent microcultures. I have to admit that I know next to nothing about the groups from which Pulitzer draws, which embrace everything from black metal to fantasy literature—they are too

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