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Sze Tsung Leong, Doel, Oost Vlaanderen, Belgium, 2009, C-print, 28 × 48". From the series “Horizons,” 2001–12.

Sze Tsung Leong

Yossi Milo Gallery

Sze Tsung Leong, Doel, Oost Vlaanderen, Belgium, 2009, C-print, 28 × 48". From the series “Horizons,” 2001–12.

In landscape photography, the horizon line—that inevitable meeting place of earth and sky—is inexorable. Consider early panoramic daguerreotypes by figures such as Friedrich von Martens and William Southgate Porter, the former of the Seine in Paris, 1845, the latter of Philadelphia’s Fairmount Water Works, 1848. But while the horizon line may always appear in such images, it is rare to find cases in which it is a work’s explicit focus, the photo’s raison d’être. This is in no small part what makes Sze Tsung Leong’s images so striking. The twenty-nine color works that were on display here, uniform in scale (twenty-eight by forty-eight inches), stand in worshipful contemplation of the earth’s edge—a line, and with Leong it is almost always a line, without the slightest hint of curvature, where land abruptly ends and the wide-open sky (that is, heaven) begins.

Leong’s

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