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View of “Carolin Eidner,” 2014. From left: Ignorance Towards What Really Is, 2014; Verticality as the Speed of Horizon, 2014; Twilight Demand, 2014.

Carolin Eidner

Natalia Hug

View of “Carolin Eidner,” 2014. From left: Ignorance Towards What Really Is, 2014; Verticality as the Speed of Horizon, 2014; Twilight Demand, 2014.

Verticality as the Speed of Horizon (all works cited, 2014) is the title of one of the pieces in Carolin Eidner’s debut gallery show, “Meanwhile ‘Me’.” The artist has only just finished her studies at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, where Rosemarie Trockel was among her teachers, and, like the title of the exhibition, Verticality as the Speed of Horizon seems to be a kind of programmatic statement. Not necessarily on the level of content, though—what might verticality as the speed of horizon mean? How could verticality be any such thing when it is the opposite of horizontality? And how are we to imagine a speed of the horizon, which is usually distinguished by its static quality?

That’s just it: It’s not the title’s perceived meaning but rather the particular approach manifested by it that sets the artist’s work apart. Eidner is one of a generation of what we might call

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