new-york

Duane Michals, Empty New York, ca. 1964, gelatin silver print, 5 1/4 × 7 1/8".

Duane Michals

DC Moore Gallery

Duane Michals, Empty New York, ca. 1964, gelatin silver print, 5 1/4 × 7 1/8".

Around 1964, Duane Michals had the habit of leaving home in the early morning to take photographs in New York. Michals was already beginning a celebrated career, both in the glossies and in galleries and museums, where his contributions to photographic discourse would come to include the staging of pictures to be viewed in short narrative sequences, fictive and symbolic, and the addition of text, usually in an apparently handwritten or hand-printed script, to guide our reading of them. The New York photos of around 1964, though, remain relatively unknown, and, in fact, this exhibition marked their first showing as a group.

There’s a well-known story about Andy Warhol driving across the country in 1963—roughly the period of these photographs—and finding that “the farther west we drove the more Pop everything looked on the highways. . . . Pop was everywhere—that was

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