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View of “Svätopluk Mikyta,” 2014. From left: Pomoderna I, 2014; Pomoderna II, 2014; Face, 2013.

Svätopluk Mikyta

Polansky Gallery

View of “Svätopluk Mikyta,” 2014. From left: Pomoderna I, 2014; Pomoderna II, 2014; Face, 2013.

Slovakian artist Svätopluk Mikyta is best known for his engagement with the topic of collective memory, appropriating and manipulating imagery derived mainly from the history of Communist Eastern Europe. The countless book and magazine clippings that are the point of departure for his complex, frequently decorative installations and compositions of found and manipulated archival photographs, as in his recent exhibition “Pomoderna and seven monochroms,” are usually taken from accounts of organized collective gatherings of the Soviet period. Intervening with red paint or pencil drawing on the surface of the image, Mikyta manipulates the original photograph and emphasizes the subject of collective manipulation. Using layers of color, he conceals certain parts of the image while emphasizing others, creating thus another, equally untrue idea of a given reality. His work should, however,

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