new-york

Dan Graham, Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout, 2014, steel, two-way mirrored glass, ivy. Installation view.

Dan Graham

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dan Graham, Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout, 2014, steel, two-way mirrored glass, ivy. Installation view.

Dan Graham is famously wide-ranging, working in film, performance, print, photography, and more, but his best-known pieces remain the pavilions that he began to develop in the late 1970s, steel-and-glass structures that shift in the viewer’s mind between sculpture to be looked at and architecture to be entered and moved through. These works are usually designed for specific places, and this year, working with the Swiss landscape architect Günther Vogt, Graham made one for the roof of the Met. Having hosted memorable shows—Doug and Mike Starn and Jeff Koons come to mind—this high outdoor space has become a summer destination for New Yorkers, particularly on Fridays and Saturdays, when the building stays open late. The Met has a bar on the roof, and the combination of drinks, a breeze, and evening views of both the summer show and Central Park is hard to beat on a warm

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