london

Goshka Macuga, Drawing no. 4. ‘Path of Movement of a Point’ After K. Malevich (1922), 2003, sand-blasted mirror, 48 × 72".

Eustachy Kossakowski and Goshka Macuga

Kate MacGarry

Goshka Macuga, Drawing no. 4. ‘Path of Movement of a Point’ After K. Malevich (1922), 2003, sand-blasted mirror, 48 × 72".

The point of departure for “Report from the Exhibition,” which juxtaposed works by Eustachy Kossakowski and Goshka Macuga, was the oeuvre of Kazimir Malevich, the father of Suprematism and the painter of that cornerstone of modernism Black Square, 1915, an image that the artist made his signature. Though his practice and thought were the foundation of the Russian avant-garde, starting in the late 1920s his work was found to be inconsistent with the official policy of socialist realism and was suppressed by the Soviet government, an act that made it difficult to access for decades. That situation began to change in the late 1980s; a major survey of Malevich’s oeuvre was recently on display at Tate Modern in London.

In “Report from the Exhibition,” selected pieces by Malevich were interpreted in photographs by Kossakowski and in mirror works by Macuga. Kossakowski’s suite of color

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