new-york

Knud Lonberg-Holm, Illustrated Production Cycle, 1937, printed matter, 10 7/8 × 8 1/2".

Knud Lonberg-Holm

Ubu Gallery

Knud Lonberg-Holm, Illustrated Production Cycle, 1937, printed matter, 10 7/8 × 8 1/2".

Like anything, the appeal of high modernism ebbs and flows. This presentation of architect Knud Lonberg-Holm’s work, assembled from an archive of photographs, drawings, letters, and other materials compiled by the late historian Marc Dessauce, suggests that in our precarious, decentralized moment, its allure is on the upswing.

Lonberg-Holm—who, until Dessauce’s heroic scholarly efforts, had largely been forgotten—was born in 1895. In 1923, after working for several years with the Berlin Bauhaus in Germany and De Stijl in his native Denmark, he settled in New York, where he quickly established himself as an ambassador of sorts for the European avant-gardes. One of his first great successes was in the medium of photography. Documenting the upwardly mobile urban spaces of the 1920s, his early pictures read as paeans to the brashness and audacity of boom-time United States.

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