mexico-city

View of “Mariana Castillo Deball,” 2014. Floor: Vista de ojos, 2014. Walls: All works Untitled, 2014.

Mariana Castillo Deball

kurimanzutto

View of “Mariana Castillo Deball,” 2014. Floor: Vista de ojos, 2014. Walls: All works Untitled, 2014.

The visual techniques of colonialism—and their tenacious legacy in the present—were the focus of the Berlin-based Mexican artist Mariana Castillo Deball’s recent show “Vista de ojos” (View of the Eyes). Three larger-than-life photographs propped against the walls of the main gallery space all bore the title UMRISS (Outline), 2014. Each photograph depicts a mask, either facedown or in reverse, on a brightly colored gradated background. The images were inspired by an international advertising campaign from the 1980s for the antipsychotic drug Stelazine that featured masks from a variety of indigenous peoples. (The ad that ran in Mexico featured several of local origin that were set on similarly hued backdrops and accompanied by a call to action from an uninspired copywriter: “Stelazine. Remove the mask of schizophrenic symptoms.”) The advertisements perpetuated the sadly

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