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Henry Flynt, Esthetics of Eerieness (selected) (detail), 1992, twelve ink-jet prints on painted MDF, each 14 1/2 × 28".

Henry Flynt

Audio Visual Arts (AVA)

Henry Flynt, Esthetics of Eerieness (selected) (detail), 1992, twelve ink-jet prints on painted MDF, each 14 1/2 × 28".

The philosopher, artist, musician, and one-time hard leftist Henry Flynt has engaged questions of bourgeois culture, formalism, and modernist aesthetics since at least 1961, when he coined the term “Concept Art” (not to be confused with Conceptual art) in a text published in the George Maciunas–designed An Anthology (1963). He is still hard at work undermining the ideology of dominant cultural forms today—long after abandoning his rigorously anti-art stance and confrontational protest tactics. Liz Kotz named him, in the pages of this magazine, the most elusive avant-gardist, and he is perhaps best known for his influential collaborations with various prominent figures, from Maciunas to La Monte Young, Jack Smith, and Walter De Maria. That Flynt has resisted the patriarch’s mantle within any movement—a particularity that also points to his uncompromising intellect—has

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