new-york

Marcel Storr, Untitled (unfinished work), 1971, pencil, colored ink, and varnish on paper, 24 × 19 5/8".

Marcel Storr

Andrew Edlin Gallery

Marcel Storr, Untitled (unfinished work), 1971, pencil, colored ink, and varnish on paper, 24 × 19 5/8".

Marcel Storr (1911–1976) was a self-taught, so-called outsider artist who lived and worked in Paris, initially at Les Halles food market, later as a street sweeper in the Bois de Boulogne. Abandoned by his mother at the age of two, he became a ward of the state. He was sickly and never sent to school, grew deaf either from beatings or illness, and was unable to write anything but his own name. But with the exquisite, meticulously executed drawings of cathedrals and “Megalopolises” in the exhibition—thirteen of Storr’s sixty-three surviving works are on display—it is clear his name will not be forgotten.

The inspectors who tracked him through childhood and adolescence noted his skill at drawing, and in adulthood, he continued to draw, working secretly, indifferent to public acclaim, as if it might interfere with his creativity. Five of the works in the exhibition have no

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