new-york

Norman Lewis, Twilight Sounds, 1947, oil on canvas, 23 1/2 × 28".

“From the Margins: Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis, 1945–1952”

The Jewish Museum

Norman Lewis, Twilight Sounds, 1947, oil on canvas, 23 1/2 × 28".

Compare and contrast—that indelible Art 101 injunction so central to creating meaning between the work of often incongruent and marginalized figures—is the analytical mode that this exhibition, “From the Margins: Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis, 1945–1952,” invites us to adopt. Lee Krasner (1908–1984), daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants and the wife of Jackson Pollock, was long ago reinstated as an Abstract Expressionist notable; Norman Lewis (1909–1979), an African American artist and founding member of the Spiral group, on the other hand, remains relatively underknown.

This richly suggestive exhibition, which remains on view through February 1, intercalates a double journey—playing Krasner’s knave to Lewis’s jack. The show begins with more or less realist self-portraits made by both artists, then moves on through the range of possibilities opened by Cubo-Surrealist

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