new-york

Gillian Jagger, And the Horses Ran, 2009, latex, plaster, sand, dimensions variable.

Gillian Jagger

David Lewis

Gillian Jagger, And the Horses Ran, 2009, latex, plaster, sand, dimensions variable.

In 1997, John Perreault published a glowing review of Gillian Jagger’s work: The artist, the critic gushed, will “eventually be seen as one of the great ones.” Is there loftier praise than that? This recent exhibition—a refreshing, if too small, sampling of the upstate New York–based artist’s sculptures from between 1963 and 2014—signaled the beginning of the reassessment Perrault predicted. It took a while. Jagger and her anthropomorphic output have typically had slippery affinities to past movements. In the mid-1960s the artist famously made plaster casts of manhole covers on the streets of New York City as a method of what she called “fact collection”; throughout the ’70s, Jagger cast more found objects with diverse materials, including polyurethane foam, while keeping a distance from ephemeral, photographic, and entropic modes. (Notably, Sol LeWitt’s photo-grids of

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