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Jason de Haan, Free and Easy Wanderer (Red River), 2014, fossils, humidifiers, concrete, dimensions variable.

Jason de Haan

Clint Roenisch

Jason de Haan, Free and Easy Wanderer (Red River), 2014, fossils, humidifiers, concrete, dimensions variable.

Last summer, the Geological Society of America released a study confirming the appearance of a new type of stone, discovered in Hawaii in 2006. To the casual observer, this may not seem like earth-shattering news. Yet these “plastiglomerates,” formed by the random fusion of melted plastic from our waste-laden ecosystem along with sand, coral, shells, and other flotsam and jetsam, might in time prove to be a pivotal marker of our age, hard-set evidence of the moment when the delicate balance between man and nature finally tipped.

Thoughts of the ebb and flow of time and our indelible place within it were never far from Jason de Haan’s mind in his solo exhibition “Free and Easy Wanderer.” Since 2008, the Calgary-based artist has made wryly idiosyncratic studies of temporal flux, using materials charged with the weight of man-made accumulation and, conversely, those with claims to

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