zurich

View of “Jutta Koether,” 2014. From left: Fiorentino Rosso Sansepolcro, 2014; Cosimo Piero Gemäldegalerie, 2014.

Jutta Koether

Galerie Francesca Pia

View of “Jutta Koether,” 2014. From left: Fiorentino Rosso Sansepolcro, 2014; Cosimo Piero Gemäldegalerie, 2014.

The paintings in Jutta Koether’s recent exhibition “Maquis” could be hard to bear, not least because they are so overloaded with history. Nearly all of them refer to works of art from the past, ranging from Botticelli and Piero di Cosimo to Mondrian, Balthus, Florine Stettheimer, and—perhaps most unlikely in this strategically inconsistent list—Lucian Freud. At the center of the show were three horizontal paintings, each installed on a pillar, thereby creating a series of cross shapes, which could be walked around. Koether does not shy away from religious connotations. One of these paintings, Fiorentino Rosso Sansepolcro (all works 2014), even cites a Mannerist deposition. Koether laid bare such references in a leaflet that accompanied the show. Yet she also dissolved them in literary prose, which, in this case, tellingly inverted the painter’s nickname, Rosso Fiorentino,

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the January 2015 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.