new-york

Keunmin Lee, Refining Hallucinations, 2014, oil and graphite on paper, 29 × 22".

Keunmin Lee

SHIN GALLERY

Keunmin Lee, Refining Hallucinations, 2014, oil and graphite on paper, 29 × 22".

The paintings and drawings in Korean-born artist Keunmin Lee’s first solo show in the United States are all titled Refining Hallucinations—that is, they depict raw hallucinations, artistically refined. According to the clinical definition, a hallucination is “an apparent perception of an external object when no such object is present.” It can be purely visual or experienced as touch. In this exhibition, Lee suggests both these sensations at once: The works are aggressively visual and dramatically haptic. The show’s centerpiece was an immense canvas that occupied nearly an entire wall, containing a complex mix of surfaces at once gestural and atmospheric. It engulfed the viewer in its frightening landscape. At one end, a vast mess of thickly entangled painted gestures—recalling stretched and crushed viscera, bodily fragments, and hideous faces—gives off a striking

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