new-york

Kiki Kogelnik, Hanging, 1970, acrylic, sheet vinyl, and hangers on canvas, 66 1/4 × 54".

Kiki Kogelnik

Simone Subal Gallery

Kiki Kogelnik, Hanging, 1970, acrylic, sheet vinyl, and hangers on canvas, 66 1/4 × 54".

Kiki Kogelnik’s art has rarely been seen in New York aside from a superb 2012 show of work from the 1960s at Simone Subal, despite the fact that the artist, who died in 1997, lived in the city for the entirety of her adult life and maintained close friendships with other significant artists such as Roy Lichtenstein and Claes Oldenburg. With “Cuts, Fissures and Identity: Works from the 1960s and 70s,” a second exhibition at Simone Subal that opened this past November, Kogelnik’s art feels hard to ignore; it puts pressure on a Pop moment we thought we knew, and, in doing so, forces us to reconsider things we may have guessed about Pop but were afraid to ask.

Though Pop was deeply committed to the image, it would have been nothing without the body, and so it is with Kogelnik’s work. The body here, however, is not simply flattened or “imaged,” but incessantly cut, poked, and prodded.

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