berlin

View of “Park McArthur,” 2014. From left: Black & White Plaid Commode, Breakfast Commode, Pink Love Commode, Calvin Klein Commode (detail), 2014; Passive Vibration Isolation 4, 2014.

Park McArthur

Lars Friedrich

View of “Park McArthur,” 2014. From left: Black & White Plaid Commode, Breakfast Commode, Pink Love Commode, Calvin Klein Commode (detail), 2014; Passive Vibration Isolation 4, 2014.

Park McArthur’s exhibition “Passive Vibration Isolation” needed just three straightforward elements to broach a topic both urgent and far-reaching. In Lars Friedrich’s new, though perhaps temporary, ground-floor space, five loading-dock bumpers hung on the walls surrounding five steel stands draped with pajama pants. Extending a narrative concerning access that McArthur had already introduced with “Ramps,” her widely acclaimed exhibition at Essex Street in New York last year, “Passive Vibration Isolation” looked at the interaction between a body and the environment it inhabits. Here, access led to friction, more specifically to a concessionary exchange wherein a body has accommodated its environment. Though the work on view didn’t look like much at first glance, by cleverly setting three terms––installation, accommodation, and commodities––into relation, McArthur opened up a

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the January 2015 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.