paris

Daiga Grantina, Quitting the House (detail), 2014, string, rope, wire, polyurethane-elastomer, polyurethane, acrylic, 92 1/2 × 6 × 6".

Daiga Grantina

GALERIE JOSEPH TANG

Daiga Grantina, Quitting the House (detail), 2014, string, rope, wire, polyurethane-elastomer, polyurethane, acrylic, 92 1/2 × 6 × 6".

“Legal Beast Language,” the title of Daiga Grantina’s first Paris solo show, is a phrase borrowed from The Age of Wire and String, American author Ben Marcus’s 1995 field guide for an alternative universe. This cryptic glossary term is the only explicit reference to Marcus’s book, but a line from the introduction—“by looking at an object we destroy it with our desire, that for accurate vision to occur the thing must be trained to see itself”—provides a useful approach to the Latvian-born, Berlin-based artist’s latest body of work: five tantalizing amalgams of found items and crudely modified industrial metals and plastics. At first glance, Grantina’s sculptures appear to be pure abstractions: contemporary incarnations of 1950s art informel. On closer inspection, however, various elements (beaded necklaces, a plastic arm, a taillight from a car) begin to take on human

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the February 2015 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.