new-york

View of “Francesco Clemente,” 2014. From left: Angels’ Tent, 2013–14; Devil’s Tent, 2013–14.

Francesco Clemente

Mary Boone Gallery | Uptown

View of “Francesco Clemente,” 2014. From left: Angels’ Tent, 2013–14; Devil’s Tent, 2013–14.

Two tents stood alongside each other at Mary Boone Gallery’s Chelsea space, facing off like opposing armies. Recalling the tents in Mogul gardens (if not the camouflage tents still in use by the Indian military), these richly evocative cloth structures were masterfully crafted. To produce them, Francesco Clemente collaborated with artisans from Jodhpur, India, using techniques such as block printing and embroidery. Then he painted sprawling, multipaneled mural-like pictures on the interior walls. These designs, drawing from a globe-spanning range of references (Christian religious tradition, Sufi spirituality, and the syncretism of Brazilian Candomblé), convey a universal theme: the enduring conflict between angels and devils, good and evil. (This show ran alongside a concurrent presentation of Clemente’s India-inspired work at New York’s Rubin Museum of Art)

On the exterior of

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