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Joachim Bandau, Der Späher (The Spy), 1974, glass-fiber-reinforced polyester, lacquer, anodized aluminum, iron wheels, 87 3/4 × 21 3/4 × 33 1/2".

Joachim Bandau

Galerie Thomas Fischer

Joachim Bandau, Der Späher (The Spy), 1974, glass-fiber-reinforced polyester, lacquer, anodized aluminum, iron wheels, 87 3/4 × 21 3/4 × 33 1/2".

Joachim Bandau is nearly eighty, his Berlin dealer very young by comparison. Agewise, they are not the only unlikely couple on the city’s art scene. It seems as if the younger generation has been gradually discovering elder or even recently deceased artists with hitherto modest curatorial or commercial recognition. Just recently, Daniel Marzona even opened his gallery with the work of Bernd Lohaus (1940–2010), more famous as a gallerist (Wide White Space, Antwerp) than as a sculptor.

But what motivates these alliances? Clearly not the allure of a household name. In some instances, a mature oeuvre infused by the debates and discourses of the 1960s or ’70s might just be appealingly manageable for a young curator: It comes with an art-historical label and an intellectual resolution, and the formal or conceptual issues it debates are usually pre-irony, pre-post-anything, and definitely

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