stockholm

View of “Sculpture After Sculpture,” 2014–15. From left: Katharina Fritsch, Elefant, 1987; Charles Ray, Tractor, 2005; Jeff Koons, Metallic Venus, 2010–12.

“Sculpture After Sculpture”

Moderna Museet | Stockholm

View of “Sculpture After Sculpture,” 2014–15. From left: Katharina Fritsch, Elefant, 1987; Charles Ray, Tractor, 2005; Jeff Koons, Metallic Venus, 2010–12.

WITH “SCULPTURE AFTER SCULPTURE,” Stockholm’s Moderna Museet staged one of the most suggestive presentations of contemporary sculpture I can remember seeing: a show brilliantly choreographed as both an experience and an argument. Few exhibitions manage to bring the two together; where “Sculpture After Sculpture” outpaced the ordinary offering was in its success in materializing its thesis as an installation, an orchestration of objects in space. Picture a presentation of just thirteen objects: no filler, no extras—just an encounter, straight up. Such a display follows from Minimalism, certainly, but also from postmodernism, though it is not mortgaged to either. Both this recent past and others more distant underpinned the exhibition’s characterization of sculpture at the present moment—sculpture as it survives when “sculpture” is dead. What we have now, as the show

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