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Yun Hyongkeun, Umber-Blue, 1978, oil on cotton, 90 3/8 × 71 1/2". From the series “Umber-Blue,” 1974–2007. From “From All Sides: Tansaekhwa on Abstraction.”

“From All Sides: Tansaekhwa on Abstraction”

Blum & Poe | Los Angeles

Yun Hyongkeun, Umber-Blue, 1978, oil on cotton, 90 3/8 × 71 1/2". From the series “Umber-Blue,” 1974–2007. From “From All Sides: Tansaekhwa on Abstraction.”

Reified as the officially sanctioned face of modern Korean art in the late 1970s and ’80s, tansaekhwa, which literally translates as “monochrome painting,” recently received a much-needed reassessment. Having run concurrently with “The Art of Dansaekhwa” at Kukje Gallery in Seoul (dansaekhwa is the revised-romanization spelling of the term) and on the heels of a modestly sized show on the same subject at Alexander Gray Associates in New York last spring, “From All Sides” constituted the first large-scale overview devoted to tansaekhwa in the United States. Included were more than forty sizable paintings, mostly from the ’70s, by six representative artists, selected by art historian Joan Kee.

For the most part, each room in the gallery was devoted to works by one of these six, allowing viewers to immerse themselves in the particular methods and materials used by each artist, and

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