kochi-india

Sahej Rahal, Harbinger (detail), 2014, clay, polyurethane, hay, found objects, dimensions variable.

the Kochi-Muziris Biennale

Kochi-Muziris Biennale

Sahej Rahal, Harbinger (detail), 2014, clay, polyurethane, hay, found objects, dimensions variable.

ALTHOUGH IT IS ONLY in its second edition, the Kochi-Muziris Biennale seems replete with history, owing to its two storied sites: Kochi, an extant port on the Arabian Sea with a long history of global trade and multicultural exchange; and Muziris, a mythical ancient port destroyed in a devastating tsunami, whose archaeological traces are thought to have been recently excavated at nearby Pattanam. Given the biennial’s brief existence, its organizers understandably feel compelled to address the region’s past, but doing so without being repetitive or contrived is a tricky proposition. Declared through a somewhat forced titular pun, “Whorled Explorations” presented a shrewd solution, offsetting the weight of local history—which is already also global owing to Kochi’s cosmopolitan maritime past—with a cosmological perspective that reveals Earth as a tiny speck in a vast

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the March 2015 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.