berlin

Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt, Cages on the Run, ca. 1980s, zincographic print, 8 1/4 × 6".

Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt

ChertLüdde

Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt, Cages on the Run, ca. 1980s, zincographic print, 8 1/4 × 6".

When a political system collapses, many an artistic practice goes down with it. This is obviously the case for those who were affiliated with the ruling power and its ideology, but the same is often true for the underground artist working in resistance to them. Such artists face the threat of a twofold damnatio memoriae: Forced to work in hiding, excluded from access to a state-regulated art infrastructure, they are usually known to a small circle only—either at home or abroad. Come the revolution, however, external interest in this oppositional art also often dwindles. This was, for instance, the fate of much of the Soviet Union’s unofficial art scene. Things don’t look much brighter for subversive artists from the former GDR. Many are still overlooked today—denied their place in a German, let alone international, art history. So one was grateful for “SIGNS FICTION,”

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the April 2015 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.