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View of “Anna Betbeze,” 2015. From left: Tangle, 2014; Sludge, 2014; Naples, 2014.

Anna Betbeze

Luxembourg & Dayan | London

View of “Anna Betbeze,” 2015. From left: Tangle, 2014; Sludge, 2014; Naples, 2014.

The nine works that were displayed in Anna Betbeze’s exhibition “Plush Vision” are both absurd and compelling. Created from flokati rugs—a type of woolen shag rug originally made in the north of Greece and now widely available—they appear, at first glance, to have been abused and distressed with fire as well as paint. Betbeze’s process involves searing the wool with pieces of smoldering wood and coal, soaking it in an acid dye, and weathering it outdoors, as well as shaving and perforating it. For her, the “soft white wool seemed [the] perfect ground to spill, stain, and defile.” This foregrounds the physicality of Betbeze’s rough and hardy approach to process: “Sometimes when they’re full of dye,” the artist explains of the rugs she works with, “they weigh two hundred pounds so I have to wrestle them.” And this sense of struggle—like wrestling a wild animal?—comes

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