new-york

Günther Förg, Untitled, 1990, acrylic on lead, 110 1/4 × 63". Skarstedt.

Günther Förg

Greene Naftali/Skarstedt

Günther Förg, Untitled, 1990, acrylic on lead, 110 1/4 × 63". Skarstedt.

The work of German artist Günther Förg, who died in 2013, has been shown infrequently in New York in recent years. So the simultaneous presentations of his art earlier this year—at Greene Naftali and Skarstedt—constituted a noteworthy event, one that followed major institutional revisitings of his contemporaries Albert Oehlen and Martin Kippenberger.

The exhibition at Greene Naftali was divided into two parts. In the gallery’s ground-floor space, visitors encountered ten large monochrome canvases from 1991, each painted a modish shade—olive, lime, and a kind of pale burnt umber, for example. If these cool hues evoke the color schemes of postwar German consumer culture (in ways reminiscent of some of Blinky Palermo’s fabric paintings, for example), their source was in fact something significantly more highbrow: the lush polychromy of Le Corbusier’s famous housing

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