london

View of “Marlie Mul,” 2015.

Marlie Mul

Vilma Gold

View of “Marlie Mul,” 2015.

In her exhibition “Arbeidsvitaminen (Labor Vitamins)” titled after the longest-running Dutch radio music show, Berlin- and London-based artist Marlie Mul unpacked a Panglossian narrative of technological progress. Reassuring viewers of our superiority to our Stone Age ancestors in a short written text, in the show she illustrated the law of progress with a selection of props. Sticking out from thirteen torn-open cardboard boxes were varnished papier-mâché replicas of wooden clubs; these appeared all the more brutal in contrast to the white packing peanuts that spilled from boxes toppled over on their sides. As was suggested by the work’s title, ‘Ug’ (Ug), ‘Duh’ (dǝ), ‘Muh’ (mɜːɹ), ‘Bam Bam’ (bæm bæm) (all works 2015), these cudgels are tools so rudimentary that they hardly deserve the name. Along with the clubs, Mul had retrieved a second type of obsolete object as a measure of

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