new-york

Rosalyn Drexler, Night Visitors, 1988, oil on canvas, 24 × 30 1/8". © Rosalyn Drexler/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New
York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York.

Rosalyn Drexler

Garth Greenan Gallery

Rosalyn Drexler, Night Visitors, 1988, oil on canvas, 24 × 30 1/8". © Rosalyn Drexler/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New
York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York.

“Women in Pop art” is a thing these days. And I’m not just talking about a few big show, such as the 2010–11 American touring exhibition “Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists 1958–1968” or the concurrent “Power Up: Female Pop Art” in Vienna. Individual artists including Evelyne Axell, Pauline Boty, Dorothy Iannone, and even Niki de Saint Phalle have lately been accorded critical attention as never before while also exerting influence on younger artists. The welcome reappearance of Rosalyn Drexler is part of this trend, and indeed crucial to it, but “Vulgar Lives,” a presentation of selected works from the 1960s and ’80s, suggested that the Pop label, while not exactly inaccurate, does not do full justice to Drexler’s art.

Or at least that’s the case if one takes as paradigmatic the best-known American Pop artists—the Warhols, Lichtensteins, Wesselmanns, et al.—who were

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