chicago

Erika Rothenberg, House of Cards (detail), 1992/2015, two of ninety greeting cards (gouache) from a mixed-media installation, dimensions variable.

Erika Rothenberg

Zolla/Lieberman Gallery

Erika Rothenberg, House of Cards (detail), 1992/2015, two of ninety greeting cards (gouache) from a mixed-media installation, dimensions variable.

Since 1991, Erika Rothenberg has employed the form and generic sentimentality of the greeting card as a means of examining a vast range of social ills and political injustices. Rothenberg’s cards, executed simply in gouache and watercolor, evidence the artist’s active imagination and keen facility for satire, tackling themes (per the plaques that served to organize this exhibition) of “religion,” “crime,” “arts and culture,” “sexual abuse,” “abortion,” “civil rights,” “health,” and “education”—in sharp contrast to the congratulations and well wishes one might expect. The resulting compositions of text and image, created over the course of twenty-five years, are a veritable anthology of poignant political truisms that delineate the persistent cultural discord that has long plagued the American social landscape. First exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1992

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