new-york

Lutz Bacher, Empire (detail), 2014, Plexiglas, sandbags, two-channel digital video (color, sound, 43 minutes 1 second), dimensions variable. Installation view.

Lutz Bacher

Greene Naftali Gallery

Lutz Bacher, Empire (detail), 2014, Plexiglas, sandbags, two-channel digital video (color, sound, 43 minutes 1 second), dimensions variable. Installation view.

One summer evening in 1964, at the suggestion of his friends, Andy Warhol trained a rented 16-millimeter camera on the Empire State Building, shooting the monolith for hours on end. The resulting film, Empire, 1964, is a study as much in cinematographic looking as it is on the properties of film itself; though the image of the building at night is otherwise fixed, small dramas play out through exposure, the shifting of light over time, and the slight jumpiness of the image as the celluloid passes through the projector.

The centerpiece of Lutz Bacher’s exhibition “For the People of New York City”—a selection of sixteen works made between 1999 and 2014—was the expansive two-channel video installation Empire, 2014, a piece similarly predicated on the properties of a time-based medium. Turned on their sides and strapped awkwardly to propped-up wooden benches, two video

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