rome

View of “Peter Linde Busk,” 2015. From left: Life’s barely long enough to get good at one thing. So be careful what you get good at, 2014; No light, but rather darkness visible, 2015; Fear the Goat from the Front, the Horse from the Rear and Man from All Sides, 2014.

Peter Linde Busk

Monitor | Rome

View of “Peter Linde Busk,” 2015. From left: Life’s barely long enough to get good at one thing. So be careful what you get good at, 2014; No light, but rather darkness visible, 2015; Fear the Goat from the Front, the Horse from the Rear and Man from All Sides, 2014.

The titles of the works in “Gentlemen,” Peter Linde Busk’s second solo exhibition at Monitor, cast a gothic shadow. The artist snipped adages and fragments of prose from sources ranging from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to the script of True Detective; these (often prolix) lines together wove a narrative of desire and shame that augmented the grisly figuration in the paintings, ceramics, lithographs, and etchings that were on view. The works themselves conjure the visual vocabularies of a slew of art-historical movements well versed in extremity—from Die Brücke and Surrealism to art brut—evincing the artist’s penchant for exploring the fine line between illegible chaos and precarious order.

Among the exhibited works were four large-scale paintings—acrylic, crayon, and pastel on linen—picturing groups of gnarled human bodies clumsily fondling one another. Rendered

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