los-angeles

Kelly Akashi, Figure oO, 2015, wood, acrylic latex paint, liquid emulsion, pigmented wax, blown pigmented glass, 8' 1" × 12' × 2'. From “SOGTFO,” 2015.

“SOGTFO”

Ghebaly Gallery

Kelly Akashi, Figure oO, 2015, wood, acrylic latex paint, liquid emulsion, pigmented wax, blown pigmented glass, 8' 1" × 12' × 2'. From “SOGTFO,” 2015.

In October 2014, the grassroots organization Hollaback! released a two-minute video of hidden-camera footage in which a curvaceous brunette is catcalled as she walks the streets of New York. Intended as a public-service announcement, the video promptly went viral. Within the art world, discussions in its wake revisited conversations initiated by artists such as Adrian Piper and VALIE EXPORT, whose practices question the conditions under which women are allowed to occupy public space. The same mechanisms of social control that police a woman’s physical presence can extend to the virtual realm, that supposedly object-free environment where women are nevertheless ubiquitously objectified, reduced to the sum of their selfies. Women who attempt to exert control over the production of their images online may find it far more difficult to curtail circulation, while those who refuse to

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