new-york

View of “Alexander Calder,” 2015. From left: Red T with Black Flags, 1946; Untitled, ca. 1956; Untitled, 1941.
Photo: Tom Powel.

Alexander Calder

Lévy Gorvy | New York

View of “Alexander Calder,” 2015. From left: Red T with Black Flags, 1946; Untitled, ca. 1956; Untitled, 1941.
Photo: Tom Powel. © Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Once Alexander Calder’s sculptures began to be sited in Boston; Paris; Spoleto, Italy; Mexico City; and other global destinations, it was apparent that this versatile artist had a knack for thinking big. Now, based on an exhibition at Dominique Lévy, it’s equally clear that, throughout his long, distinguished career, he also had a gift for making small-size stabiles, mobiles, and maquettes.

Whether his sculptures are only two inches high or just five inches wide, they all have the hallmarks of work by Alexander Calder. You’ll find whimsical biomorphic forms; a palette reduced mostly to red, yellow, blue, and black; and elements that move in a light breeze. They are also marvels of his remarkably imaginative engineering skills. Though they are as serious as a classical-era statue, good Calders tend to put a smile on your face. Some enchant, others charm; quite a few dazzle with

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