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Robin Bruch, Untitled, 1983, acrylic and oil crayon on paper, 26 1/2 × 38 1/2".

Robin Bruch

Mathew | Gallery | Berlin

Robin Bruch, Untitled, 1983, acrylic and oil crayon on paper, 26 1/2 × 38 1/2".

Objects in this exhibition may have been more complicated than they appeared. Robin Bruch’s prosaically titled exhibition “Major Works on Paper (1972–1985) II” looked like yet another painting show, but it actually raised quite a few questions of ethical-curatorial concern. Bruch, born in the United States in 1948, was introduced to the Berlin art crowd by Mathew three years ago, after the Berlin-based American artist Megan Francis Sullivan stumbled on her work by chance and brought her to the attention of the gallery, which staged the first chapter of what can now be seen as a two-part presentation, featuring twelve paintings, an artist’s book, and two ceramic plates, all from the 1970s and ’80s. In Bruch’s most recent show, the same book and ceramics returned along with nine paintings on paper.

Bruch’s life and oeuvre make her the prototypical female artist ripe for rediscovery.

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