dublin

Vittorio Santoro, Reasoning Is Faultless (But Wrong Nonetheless), II, 2015, four concealed objects, acrylic on canvas, cord, plywood, 31 1/4 × 31 1/4 × 2 1/2".

Vittorio Santoro

Oonagh Young Gallery

Vittorio Santoro, Reasoning Is Faultless (But Wrong Nonetheless), II, 2015, four concealed objects, acrylic on canvas, cord, plywood, 31 1/4 × 31 1/4 × 2 1/2".

In a 1969 interview, Vladimir Nabokov declared that teachers of James Joyce’s Ulysses should ignore “the pretentious nonsense of Homeric, chromatic, and visceral chapter headings” and instead “prepare maps of Dublin with Bloom’s and Stephen’s intertwining itineraries clearly traced.” For Nabokov, “any ass” could assimilate a book’s general ideas. It was the “sensual spark” created by a text’s uniquely combined details that truly mattered.

Swiss-Italian artist Vittorio Santoro shares something of this zeal for literary detail. The minimal forms and elliptical content of his drawings, actions, and installations have often been inspired by decisive moments in canonical novels or triggered by a fanboy’s enthusiasm for pinpointing the specific places where major writers lived. A fastidious but eccentric analyst of text and context, he has, for instance, used everyday household fittings

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