new-york

Beverly Buchanan, Moonshine Man’s House, 2009, wood, 12 × 16 3/4 × 18 1/2".

Beverly Buchanan

Andrew Edlin Gallery

Beverly Buchanan, Moonshine Man’s House, 2009, wood, 12 × 16 3/4 × 18 1/2".

Beverly Buchanan’s tabletop cabins and shacks evoke rural life, and a passing glance at these seemingly cobbled-together structures might typecast them as some interesting kind of folk art. But Buchanan studied in New York with the Abstract Expressionist Norman Lewis and was close to Romare Bearden, and she arrived at these sculptures after a period, begun in the 1970s, of working with blocks of cast concrete, which she piled and leaned in ways relating to post-Minimalism and Land art. Eventually, though, as she wrote in an artist’s statement, her “vision and interest shifted to the reality of current places and their surrounding landscape. The house and its yard and the road behind and across.” The works that resulted are full of a sense of the South, where Buchanan, who sadly died earlier this year, was from.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, a friction runs through the work between the

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