new-york

Maria Nordman, FILMROOM EAT, 1967–PRESENT, two 16-mm black-and-white films transferred to digital video, table, table-cloth. Installation view.

Maria Nordman

Marian Goodman Gallery | New York

Maria Nordman, FILMROOM EAT, 1967–PRESENT, two 16-mm black-and-white films transferred to digital video, table, table-cloth. Installation view.

Present. It’s a keyword in Maria Nordman’s oeuvre and a cipher in much of her work. Beginning in the late 1960s, Nordman has designated her works as continuous, signaling the way they are always ongoing; user-driven; focused toward a public, a task, or an “outside of itself,” as Heidegger might have formulated it. A case in point is FILMROOM EAT 1967–PRESENT, the heart of this brisk retrospective-like show (though retrospective seems like the wrong word, and too confining, since each work has a “co-authorial role”—think relational aesthetics avant la lettre).

For this iteration of the work, a sign outside a structure instructs that only two visitors may enter at a time. Inside, a wall separates two silent 16-mm black-and-white projections. These show the same scene—an actor and actress serving themselves a fancy meal—but frame it with a static shot on the right side

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the October 2015 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.