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View of “Thomas Bayrle,” 2015. From left: São Paulo/church, 2015; Donezk, 2015; Brescia, 2014; Mexico City, 2014; Gerano Pavesi/church, 2015.

Thomas Bayrle

Galerie Barbara Weiss

View of “Thomas Bayrle,” 2015. From left: São Paulo/church, 2015; Donezk, 2015; Brescia, 2014; Mexico City, 2014; Gerano Pavesi/church, 2015.

A simple tire perched on the wall of Thomas Bayrle’s recent show “Gerano/Pavesi” (Geraniums/Pavesi) recalled the elementary forms of Kazimir Malevich’s most austere Suprematist canvases: black circle, white field, end of story. But just as Malevich’s pared-down images are, in fact, richly differentiated material constructions in which, the artist claimed, one can see “the face of God,” so Bayrle’s tire—or more precisely, his Santa Maria, Madre di Dio, prega per noi peccatori, adesso e nell’ora della nostra morte, 2009—is much more than a dumb, tacked-up rubber disk. It isn’t rubber, for one thing, but impeccably carved wood, with the opening words of the rosary replacing FIRESTONE on its side as well as giving the work its title; subtly articulated crosses serve as tread. Mounted on an integrated flange mechanism, the tire is, however, still made to spin, and does so

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