new-york

Rita McBride, Middle East, 2015, water-jet-cut brass plate with silver nitrate patina and Renaissance wax, three parts, overall 20 1/2 × 29 × 1/4".

Rita McBride

Alexander and Bonin

Rita McBride, Middle East, 2015, water-jet-cut brass plate with silver nitrate patina and Renaissance wax, three parts, overall 20 1/2 × 29 × 1/4".

Rita McBride’s recent exhibition “Access” displayed a number of new sculptures in the shape of keys, keyholes, knockers, and locks, as well as a variety of large metal sheets out of which at least some of the works in the show had been cut. McBride individually designed each work on a computer and then sent her drawings out to a shop where they were sliced out of a variety of metals. The surprise is that the results do not betray the somewhat high-tech process by which these works were made. Rather, they look crude and basic, almost handmade and certainly aged, their various edges displaying inconsistencies and aberrations. This effect is due in large part to the fact that McBride patinated her objects much as a forger would age a coin, applying chemicals and treatments so as to transform them into real fakes, things both weighty and brittle, inelegant with sharp edges. For all

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