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Francesco Vezzoli, The Eternal Kiss, 2015, white Carrara marble (female ca. 117–38 CE; male ca. second century CE), watercolor, black African-marble plinth, 19 1/4 × 19 1/4 × 13 3/4". Photo: Prudence Cuming.

Francesco Vezzoli

Almine Rech Gallery | London Savile Row

Francesco Vezzoli, The Eternal Kiss, 2015, white Carrara marble (female ca. 117–38 CE; male ca. second century CE), watercolor, black African-marble plinth, 19 1/4 × 19 1/4 × 13 3/4". Photo: Prudence Cuming.

When Francesco Vezzoli had the five ancient Roman marble heads in his 2014–15 exhibition “Teatro Romano” at MoMA PS1 painted in garish colors that evoked their original polychromy, some critics expressed their relief that he had not also replaced the statues’ broken-off noses. Now the extravagant Italian artist has done just that, and the result, while no less controversial than “Teatro Romano,” turned out to be more thematically rich.

For “Francesco Vezzoli’s Eternal Kiss,” the missing noses of two white Roman Carrara-marble heads, which Vezzoli had again acquired at auction—one male, circa second century CE, the other female, circa 117–38 CE—had been expertly reconstructed. However, in contrast to the fuller polychromy featured in “Teatro Romano,” on this occasion, only the woman’s lips had been lightly tinted. The plastic surgery and cosmetic touch-up performed under

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