beijing

Yan Xing, The Story of Shame (detail), 2015, ink-jet prints, silk-embroidered socks and silk handkerchiefs, shoe, dimensions variable. Photo: Hao Ge.

Yan Xing

Galerie Urs Meile | Beijing 麦勒画廊

Yan Xing, The Story of Shame (detail), 2015, ink-jet prints, silk-embroidered socks and silk handkerchiefs, shoe, dimensions variable. Photo: Hao Ge.

In Yan Xing’s 2013 solo show at Galerie Urs Meile, the artist suspended a monitor from the courtyard entrance that played a video spelling out, in Chinese characters, the title of Richard Hamilton’s seminal 1956 collage Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing? This earlier installation was alluded to in Yan’s recent exhibition at the gallery: A copper plate inscribed with the character for “thief”—the title of both this show and this particular piece (2015)—was affixed to one of the courtyard’s steely gray–painted walls. These walls appear yet again in a new video work (also titled Thief, 2015), behind a young man in a suit who nervously holds a dagger while anxiously assessing his surroundings. This scene follows one in which two young men pry open a stolen oyster with a similar blade. In this way, symbols recur in Yan’s work, forming a

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