new-york

Avinash Chandra, Untitled, 1963, acrylic, watercolor, pastel, and marker on paper, 47 3/4 × 71 1/2 ".

Avinash Chandra

DAG Modern | New York

Avinash Chandra, Untitled, 1963, acrylic, watercolor, pastel, and marker on paper, 47 3/4 × 71 1/2 ".

The work of Avinash Chandra (1931–1991) went through four periods, more or less coordinate with the places in which he lived. Arranged chronologically, this show—billed as a retrospective of the Simla, India–born painter’s art—surveyed these stages via sixty-two works made between the 1950s and 1980s. First, there was the New Delhi period. During this time, Chandra made relatively sober, often gloomy landscapes, typically showing houses in forests. These works were thickly painted and tightly composed, suggesting an insular world and claustrophobic space from which there is no escape. There is a density and heaviness to the painterly impasto, its broad, static strokes conveying the impenetrability of the woods. Then, in 1956, came the London period, during which he continued to paint landscapes, but also made hedonistic, sexually explicit paintings of the male and female

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