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Brigid Berlin, Untitled (Self-Portrait with Wig II), ca. 1971–73, Polaroid, 3 3/8 × 4 1/4".

Brigid Berlin

INVISIBLE-EXPORTS

Brigid Berlin, Untitled (Self-Portrait with Wig II), ca. 1971–73, Polaroid, 3 3/8 × 4 1/4".

“Everyone, absolutely everyone, was tape-recording everyone else,” Andy Warhol noted about the Factory days. Everyone, perhaps, but no one as avidly as Brigid Berlin. From the 1960s through the ’70s, Berlin made thousands of tapes, recording everything from her morning calls with Warhol to the late-night local news. The droning audio of these tapes formed the backdrop to Berlin’s remarkable exhibition “It’s All About Me,” a collection of twenty-three Polaroids, more than forty “Tit Prints,” 1966–96, and a selection of journals and albums. The barely audible snippets of banal conversation seemed to extend the images well beyond the single room they occupied, insinuating that there were just as many photographs of herself and of Andy as hours of tape.

Seen together, the Polaroids are distinctive in a way the tapes are not. These images, all dated ca. 1971–73, are marked by an internal

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