oxford

View of “Kiki Kogelnik: Fly Me to the Moon,” 2015. Photo: Benjamin Cosmo Westoby. © Kiki Kogelnik Foundation.

Kiki Kogelnik

Modern Art Oxford

View of “Kiki Kogelnik: Fly Me to the Moon,” 2015. Photo: Benjamin Cosmo Westoby. © Kiki Kogelnik Foundation.

“FLY ME TO THE MOON,” Britain’s first Kiki Kogelnik retrospective, complemented Tate Modern’s revisionist and staccato survey “The World Goes Pop.” Coinciding with Modern Art Oxford’s exhibition, Tate Modern showcased the work of female Pop artists who had been rediscovered during the past decade, including Kogelnik herself. (It’s worth noting that Katalin Nay invited Kogelnik to hold a retrospective in Budapest in 1992; her work was also included in the 1993 show “Variations on Pop Art,” curated by Katalin Keserü at Budapest’s Műcsarnok—a purely Hungarian story, yet an unacknowledged predecessor of “The World Goes Pop.”) Born in Austria in 1935, Kogelnik during her Pop period was essentially based in New York, though over the course of her career she spent time in Europe, in particular her native Vienna. Influenced by the Viennese Actionist generation, she was a performer

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