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View of “Christine Sun Kim,” 2015–16. Foreground: Viewers interacting with Game of Skill 1.0, 2015. Photo: Robin Reeve.

Christine Sun Kim

Carroll / Fletcher

View of “Christine Sun Kim,” 2015–16. Foreground: Viewers interacting with Game of Skill 1.0, 2015. Photo: Robin Reeve.

In a recent TED Talk, Christine Sun Kim commented that, “As a deaf person living in a world of sound, it’s as if I was living in a foreign country, blindly following its rules, customs, behaviors, and norms without ever questioning them.” She went on to explain that she used to make paintings, but when she noticed that nearly every exhibition she visited displayed a work incorporating an element of sound, she began to wonder if she was now going to be excluded from contemporary art. She therefore decided to reclaim her “ownership of sound” via her work—something that, as a deaf child, she had been taught was not part of her life. Since then, Kim’s art has explored her relationship to sound, which she has described as “like money, power, control—a social currency,” a thing that is “so powerful that it could either disempower me and my artwork, or it could empower me. I

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