new-york

View of “Jason Simon,” 2015. On floor: 2LGA5, 2015. On wall, from left: Production, 2015; Nobodys Road, 2015. Photo: Chris Austin.

Jason Simon

Callicoon Fine Arts

View of “Jason Simon,” 2015. On floor: 2LGA5, 2015. On wall, from left: Production, 2015; Nobodys Road, 2015. Photo: Chris Austin.

In an age when the entire history of recorded music is just a click away, it’s tempting to dismiss radio as a hopelessly antiquated medium. After all, why rely on a DJ when Spotify and iTunes allow you to compile your own playlists? Yet, as is often remarked, the self-curated online/digital experience, for all its potential, can ultimately become isolating. Conventional radio at its best retains the power to establish and strengthen the bonds of community by making a virtue of broadcasters’ idiosyncratic tastes and voices. And local radio can add to that a capacity to respond to specificities of place while also allowing for a shared experience within a given locale.

Jason Simon’s recent exhibition “Request Lines Are Open” documented the resonance of one particular example of local radio, a show called Soul Spectrum on WJFF, a public station based in Jeffersonville, New York, close

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