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Nuno da Luz, Untitled, 2015, survival blankets, aluminum rail, 11' 10“ × 35' 8”. Photo: Bruno Lopes.

Nuno da Luz

Galeria Vera Cortês

Nuno da Luz, Untitled, 2015, survival blankets, aluminum rail, 11' 10“ × 35' 8”. Photo: Bruno Lopes.

The dichotomy between nature and culture has been at the center of Nuno da Luz’s practice for several years now. Many of his works examine the subject of wilderness, questioning the widespread assumption that this environment is somehow “other.” In his frequently immaterial works—recordings, sound installations, or temporary situations inside or outside formal exhibition spaces—da Luz addresses man’s alienation from the sphere of the natural, while pointing to the processes by which nature has been colonized and gradually rendered extinct. Rather than simply illustrating a power struggle between the cultural and the natural, however, da Luz explores the possibilities of their engagement—that is, the capacity of natural phenomena to participate in the production of the artwork; in this way, the frequently unpredictable powers of nature become more than just subject

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