new-york

Ronnie Landfield, Blue Wall, 1970, acrylic on canvas, 82 × 103".

Ronnie Landfield

57 STUX + Haller Gallery

Ronnie Landfield, Blue Wall, 1970, acrylic on canvas, 82 × 103".

Ronnie Landfield was once an enfant terrible: In 1967, at the age of twenty, he was invited to exhibit in the Whitney Annual an eight-foot-square painting called The Howl of Terror, a terrifyingly mystical Abstract Expressionist work. Now sixty-nine, he’s mellowed into an elder statesman, yet his paintings, albeit today somewhat tamer, are still poetic, the artist still seeking, as he puts it, to “fill the void that defines who we are”—fill it with glorious color, his forte from the beginning.

Paintings such as Long Way Across and Twilight Rise, both 2015, are “constructions”—Landfield’s term—of broad, flat planes of stained canvas, sometimes thin, sometimes thick. The planes are piled atop one another, forming abstract landscapes clearly indebted to Color Field painting. (Indeed, Landfield calls the “initial Color Field painters and Abstract Expressionists” his “

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